Tamiment Library and Wagner Archives

Radical archives bringing you labor and left history

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"Our Planes"; Harry Randall: Fifteenth International Brigade Films and Photographs; ALBA PHOTO 011; box 6; 1504; Tamiment Library/Robert F. Wagner Labor Archives 

78 years ago today, the Spanish Civil War began between the nationalists  led by General Francisco Franco and the democratically-elected Spanish Republic.  In January of 1937, the first American volunteers arrived in Spain to aid in the fight against fascism.  

 

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Harry Randall: Fifteenth International Brigade Films and Photographs; ALBA PHOTO 011; box 1; 405; Tamiment Library/Robert F. Wagner Labor Archives 

Eventually, 40,000 international troops would come to the aid of the Spanish Republic.  The many volunteers wrote letters home, brought back posters, and took photographs.

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Harry Randall: Fifteenth International Brigade Films and Photographs; ALBA PHOTO 011; box 5; 1493; Tamiment Library/Robert F. Wagner Labor Archives 

The Tamiment Library holds hundreds of linear feet of materials from the Abraham Lincoln Brigade, the group of 2,800 American volunteers in Spain.  Though the nationalist Franco won the war, the volunteers’ contributions are preserved in the Tamiment’s collections.

 

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Harry Randall: Fifteenth International Brigade Films and Photographs; ALBA PHOTO 011; box 5; 1490; Tamiment Library/Robert F. Wagner Labor Archives 

The Abraham Lincoln Brigade Archives, or ALBA, encompass personal papers, printed ephemera, posters, photos, scrapbooks, films, artifacts, records from the Veterans of the Abraham Lincoln Brigades, and much more.  The collections are particularly notable for the strong representation of female volunteers such as chief nurse Fredericka Martin.  Peruse the list of volunteers here or browse the full list of ALBA collections here.

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Harry Randall: Fifteenth International Brigade Films and Photographs; ALBA PHOTO 011; box 1; 403; Tamiment Library/Robert F. Wagner Labor Archives 

Filed under Spanish civil war franco fascism archives history

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Many St. Patrick’s Day parades have been controversial for their prohibitions on including LGBT groups, with New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio marching in the alternate St. Pat’s For All, and Guinness, Heineken, and the Boston Beer Company pulling sponsorship from the Boston and New York City parades.

Irish Echo Photographs; AIA 045; Archives of Irish America, Tamiment Library/Robert F. Wagner Labor Archives, New York University.

Reposting this in honor of LGBT Pride Month!

Filed under lgbt lgbtq pride queer history irish american history

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The Equal Pay Act was signed into law on this day 51 years ago by then-President John F. Kennedy.  It was meant to be a step forward in ensuring equal wages across gender lines.
This 1982 cartoon is from the Tamiment’s Gary Huck and Mike Konopacki Labor Cartoons Collection, which contains 38 linear feet of political cartoons created in the 1980’s, 1990’s, and 2000’s.  Huck’s cartoon illustrates the gender wage gap that persisted 19 years after the Equal Pay Act was passed.  
The Equal Pay Act was signed into law on this day 51 years ago by then-President John F. Kennedy.  It was meant to be a step forward in ensuring equal wages across gender lines.

This 1982 cartoon is from the Tamiment’s Gary Huck and Mike Konopacki Labor Cartoons Collection, which contains 38 linear feet of political cartoons created in the 1980’s, 1990’s, and 2000’s.  Huck’s cartoon illustrates the gender wage gap that persisted 19 years after the Equal Pay Act was passed.  

Filed under equal pay women's history archives political cartoons equal pay act

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Tamiment is celebrating Asian-Pacific American Heritage Month! Come in and check out a few of our dynamic collections highlighting Asian-Pacific American’s in Labor: Asian Women United Records and Photographs, the Darlene Woe Papers, and the Rocky Chin Papers!

Filed under apa libraries archives labor asian pacific american

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On this day 120 years ago, Pullman Palace Car Company workers went on strike to protest long work days, low wages, and poor living conditions.
35% of Pullman Company workers were a part of the American Railway Union at the time of the Pullman Strike in 1894.  This publication was the official organ of the union, with this issue dating to just a few months before the historic strike.  This copy of the publication is from labor leader and then-ARU president Eugene Debs’ personal collection, housed here at the Tamiment.

On this day 120 years ago, Pullman Palace Car Company workers went on strike to protest long work days, low wages, and poor living conditions.

35% of Pullman Company workers were a part of the American Railway Union at the time of the Pullman Strike in 1894.  This publication was the official organ of the union, with this issue dating to just a few months before the historic strike.  This copy of the publication is from labor leader and then-ARU president Eugene Debs’ personal collection, housed here at the Tamiment.

Filed under pullman strike labor unions history Eugene Debs

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Here’s a sneak peek from next week’s post on Mother’s Day, women, and labor at everyone’s favorite NYU archives and special collections blog, The Back Table!

Today, many families across the U.S. will join together to celebrate Mother’s Day—the national holiday where we celebrate the women who birthed, raised, or nurtured us.  For many of us, our mothers are our first teachers, doctors, friends, therapists, and confidants.  From the time of our conception onward, mothers protect, nurture, and provide for their offspring, both in and outside of the home.

Mothers devote their lives to individuals throughout the world by participating in the labor force.  In fact, the U.S. labor market as we know it was created and maintained via the highly skilled unpaid labor of women (and men) brought  to this country during the 17th century.  In addition to the Native American population, African women transported to the U.S. for the purposes of labor (amongst other things) literally and figuratively birthed and raised the U.S. labor force.   In short—mothers work, hard .   On this Mother’s Day, what better way to honor our mothers, than to take a look back at the role they have played in in our lives, as well as the lives of globally by contributing to the work force.

Historically, women have been involved in labor unions dating back to the early 1800’s.  Women began creating their own unions, separate of men, to protect their rights as factory workers and laborers.  Early women labor unions included The Daughters of St. Crispin, International Ladies’ Garment Workers Union, The United Tailoresses of New York, The Women’s Trade Union League, The National Typographical Union, and The Lowell Female Labor Reform Association.  Women rallied for causes including the number  of hours in a work day, safe conditions, and fair wages.  Countless individuals within these organizations have created the changes needed to protect the rights of women workers.

Continue reading Monday over at The Back Table!

Filed under mother's day mothers women labor history